Palabra/Frase española de la semana






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Palabra/Frase española de la semana.

Each week, a new word/phrase will be posted. At the beginning of each week, students will copy down the new word or phrase into their notebook on their appropriate page. Every time a student utilizes their word or phrase CORRECTLY in written assignments that week or during oral activities they will be awarded an extra credit point, homework pass, or a high five from Miss Schleicher and a “eres la leche!” depending on how she’s feeling 

  1. apuntarse -- To accompany others or do the same as others do. (Ex: ¿Vas al cine? ¡Me apunto!)

  2. Boli (m) -- Pen. This word is used more frequently than pluma. It is short for bolígrafo.

  3. Caer gordo -- To oppose something or someone. (Ex: Me cae gordo ese político.)

  4. Colado/colao -- A person who goes places he/she is not invited entering without paying. Verb form: colarse.

  5. Cotillear -- To gossip or be curious about other people's business. Also used to describe such actions as eavesdropping on others' conversations, reading other people's mail, etc. In Spain, this is never a positive action or attribute, but in some circles is perfectly acceptable behavior. In actuality, gossip is common in most madrileño conversation. Noun form: cotilla

  6. Dar la lata -- To bug, annoy, bother. (literal translation: to give the can).

  7. De cajón -- Evident, totally certain, obvious. (Ex: Es de cajón que Diana recibirá una "A" en su examen: estudia cada día.)

  8. Echarme una siesta -- Be careful not to use "tomar" una siesta as it is better to use the verb echar in its reflexive form, meaning to lie down.

  9. Gazpacho (m) -- A mess, predicament or jam, (literal translation: a type of Spanish tomato soup).

  10. Gente maja (f) -- When you want to say that someone is really pleasant, nice and/or generous, you can refer to them as gente maja. In other words, you are saying, "They are good people."

  11. Hincha (m) -- Fan of a specific soccer team. Una hinchada is a group of soccer fans.

  12. Mala pata (f) -- Bad luck. (Ex: Fue mala pata que perdiera 1.000 euros en la calle.)

  13. La marcha (f) (mar-chuh) -- Nightlife. However, it also means so much more than this since it also refers to the energy that Spaniards have when night time rolls around. It refers to dancing, eating, drinking and socializing. Spanish cities come to life after dark and la marcha refers to the entire scene... people crowding streets at all hours, dance clubs with long lines to get in, corner bars where friends meet one another, eating churros con chocolate in the morning before crawling into bed, etc. Synonymous to movida. Salir de marcha = To go out, to go party.

  14. Móvil (m) -- Cell phone. You will get strange looks if you call it "un celular" so be sure to use móvil. Practically everyone in Spain has one so make sure you know what it is called!

  15. Ni fu ni fa -- An expression that communicates indifference. (Ex: ¿Qué te parece esta falda?----Ni fu ni fa.)

  16. ¡Ojo! -- Look out! Watch out! (Ex: ¡Ojo! Caminar sóla por la noche es peligroso.)

  17. ¡Olé! -- Yippee! Alright!

  18. Pasta (f) -- Means money. (Ex: ¿Tienes pasta?)

  19. Pijo (m/f) -- An insult given to yuppies from Spain with no fixed age implied. Most often a pijo or pija is within his or her late teens to early thirties. He or she has expensive and most often poor taste and "Daddy" pays for everything.

  20. Tapa (f) -- Tapas are small rations of meat, potatoes, fish and vegetables that are eaten at bars typically while having a cocktail. Tapas are sometimes served free while others cost a small fee. Many Spaniards eat tapas in the evening rather than sitting down to eat a full dinner. As compared to the way we refer to appetizers in the US, tapas do not come before a meal, but either accompany the act of drinking or are often eaten instead of a meal.

  21. Tapear, or ir de tapas -- To eat tapas; to go from bar to bar eating these small appetizers.

  22. Tapeo (m) -- The noun form of this activity. Refers to the entire event of going to bars and eating tapas.

  23. Tertulia (f) -- Occurs when people meet together to chit--chat about everyday happenings whether it be the weather, politics, trends or even what María Josefina did last night. The Spaniards love having tertulias especially at outdoor cafés.

  24. Vale -- This is used in the same way as we use "OK" or any of its equivalents: sure, I understand, I agree, etc. (Ex: Denota que se está de acuerdo con que otro dice o hace). When the Spanish say it, it kind of sounds like "ballet."

  25. ¡Venga, hombre! -- It is usually said at the end of a sentence to mean the following: "Yeah right," "Really, I don't believe you at all," "You have to be kidding," or "Stop it." You can also use: ¡Qué va! ¡Qué bobada! ¡Qué disparate! or ¡Qué tontería!

  26. Viejo verde (m) -- An older man who preys on young women. In English, we say "dirty old man."

  27. Buenas = (buey-NAS) A greeting used at any time of the day. Similar to Hello / Hola, but more informal.

  28. Cabezota = (ka-bay-though-ta) Stubborn, when used as an adjective, and a stubborn person, when used as a noun.

  29. Chaval / chavala = (cha-ball / cha-ball-ah) Guy, boy, kid, lad / girl.

  30. Chiringuito = (chi-riin-gEE-to) Beach bar or seaside restaurant.

  31. Chorrada = (cho-rA-da) Nonsense. ¡Qué chorrada! = What a bit of nonsense!

  32. Chulo = (chew-low) When used as an adjective, chulo can mean: 1) nice, cool, etc. 2) cute, good-looking, 3) arrogant, insolent, cocky. ¡Qué chulo! = How cute! How cool!

  33. Cutre = (coo-tray) Cheap, seedy, shabby, tacky, kitschy, cheesy.

  34. Enchufe = (en-choo-fay) A connection, a contact, someone who has some kind of power or influence and can help you. An enchufe could get you a job interview, for example. Enchufe literally means a plug or a socket though.

  35. Estar como una cabra = (es-tar ko-mo Oon-a ka-bra) To be completely crazy, nuts, bonkers.

  36. Finde = Weekend. Shortened version of fin de semana.

  37. Friki = (free-key) Nerd, geek, freak. For example, a friki de ordenadores is a computer nerd and a friki de ciencia ficción is a sci-fi geek.

  38. Guay = (gwhy) Cool. ¡Qué guay! = How cool! How neat! How cool is that!

  39. Guiri = (gEE-ree) Foreigner in Spain, especially an Anglo-Saxon or northern European foreigner. This word can be as affectionate or as disparaging as the speaker intends to make it.

  40. Hortera = (or-ter-ah) Tacky, in bad taste.

  41. Ir a su bola = (ear ah sue bowl-a) To do one’s own thing. For example, “No asistí a la fiesta, fui a mi bola” means “I didn’t go to the party, I did my own thing.”

  42. Locutorio = (low-coo-tore-e-yo) Internet café where you can also make telephone calls (especially long-distance ones) in private booths, top up your mobile phone credit, buy phone cards, send faxes, etc. Locutorios largely cater to the non-Spanish market and can be found anywhere there’s a significant immigrant population in Spain.

  43. Mileurista = (mill-lure-ista) Someone who earns approximately 1,000 euros per month. This relatively recent social phenomenon is a person in Spain who is often imagined as a twentysomething or thirtysomething with a low-paying job, who may or may not live with their parents, may or may not have a university degree, but has low prospects for improving their economic outlook.

  44. Mono = (mo-no) Cute, when used as an adjective. ¡Qué mono! = How cute! Used as a noun, mono means monkey.

  45. Nene / nena = (nay-nay / nay-nah) Baby / baby, chick, as in, “Hey, baby!” (Hola, nene [for a male] or Hola, nena [for a female]) or “I like that chick!” / “A mí me gusta esa nena.”

  46. Operación bikini = (oh-per-ah-the-own be-key-knee) The pre-summer custom many people have of exercising, going on a diet, joining a gym, and other activities associated with wanting to look good in a bikini or swimsuit.

  47. Operación salida = (oh-per-ah-the-own sa-lee-dah) Mass exodus and the resulting traffic on Spanish roads and highways at the beginning and end of the summer holiday season and various long weekends and holidays throughout the year.

  48. Pasar de = (pah-saar day) To care less (about someone or something).

  49. Pijo/a = (pee-ho) Upper class conservative, when used as a noun, and yuppy, preppy, posh, stuck up, snooty, and snobbish, when used as an adjective.

  50. Puente = (pwen-tay) Long weekend due to a bank holiday.

  51. ¡Qué fuerte! or ¡Qué pasada! = (kay f-where-tay / kay pah-saa-dah) Wow! In other words, these expressions indicate great surprise or amazement, which can have positive or negative connotations, depending on the context.

  52. Ser la leche = (sayr la lay-chay) To be amazing (in a positive or negative sense).

  53. Siniestro = (see-knee-yestro) Goth, gothic.

  54. Tener buen rollo / tener mal rollo = (ten-air bwen Roy-yo / ten-air mAll Roy-yo) To have good vibes, to have good chemistry. / To have bad vibes, to have bad chemistry. For example, “Mis compañeros de piso y yo tenemos buen rollo” means “My roommates and I get on very well.”

  55. Terraza = (teR-a-zah) Sidewalk café, bar, restaurant, or seating area. Many cafes and restaurants in Spain expand their seating area by setting up tables and chairs outdoors – most often during the summertime, but some terrazas are year-round.

  56. Tío / tía = (tea-yo / tea-ya) Guy or girl. This word is used in Spain more often than its English definition reveals, however, and is frequently heard in informal speech and/or among friends. For example, “Tía, ¿qué haces?” / “What are you doing?” (said to a woman friend).

  57. Tío bueno / tía buena = (tea-yo bwen-oh / tea-ya bwen-ah) A hot guy / hot girl. Or a hunk / hottie.

  58. Tipo = (tea-poh) Guy, especially a stranger. For example, “Did you see that guy?” / “¿Has visto a ese tipo?”

  59. Topmanta = (topp-mahn-tah) Illegal street vendor who displays his wares (often pirated or counterfeited goods) on a small square of cloth – a manta / blanket, if you will – that is handily bundled up at a moment’s notice by the vendor, who often flees when the police appear.

  60. Fliparse- to be crazy, mad, wild about, to be enthusiastic about someone or something.

La senorita Schleicher se flipa por Harry Potter. Miss Schleicher goes crazy for H.P.

  1. Tirar los tejos -This expression is used to try to conquer or to make a girl or a boy fall in love. It means to make love proposals, to say comments with the purpose of getting the affection of a person. ¿Sabes que el otro día estabas muy guapa en la fiesta? Lo siento, no puedo evitar tirarte los tejos, pero es que me gustas mucho. –Do you know how pretty you looked at the party the other day? I’m sorry, I can’t avoid hitting on you, but I like you a lot.

  2. Salir por un ojo de la cara (literally: Cost an eye) This is used to say that something is very expensive. Saying “the car cost me an eye” is like saying that to buy the car I had to sell an eye. In English there’s the very anatomically similar expression of “to cost an arm and a leg.”

  3. A todo cerdo le llega su San Martín (literally: Every pig gets its San Martin’s Day): This mysterious proverb is used to express the inevitability of fate. The expression alludes to the natural expiration all things, and, more specifically, the inevitable end of those who do evil. It turns out that, in Spain, the traditional day for the slaughter of pigs (of which, between hams, bacon and sausages, nothing goes to waste) is on November 11, and in Spain this date corresponds to St. Martin of Tours. So, when hearing on the news that a politician is convicted on corruption charges, many will say, with satisfaction: “See? Eventually, every pig gets its San Martin’s Day.” A possible equivalent saying in English might be “What goes around, comes around” or “you reap what you sow.”



Apuntarse -- To accompany others or do the same as others do. (Ex: ¿Vas al cine? ¡Me apunto!)

Boli (m) -- Pen. This word is used more frequently than pluma. It is short for bolígrafo.

Caer gordo -- To oppose something or someone. (Ex: Me cae gordo ese político.)

Colado/colao -- A person who goes places he/she is not invited entering without paying. Verb form: colarse.

Cotillear -- To gossip or be curious about other people's business. Also used to describe such actions as eavesdropping on others' conversations, reading other people's mail, etc. In Spain, this is never a positive action or attribute, but in some circles is perfectly acceptable behavior. In actuality, gossip is common in most madrileño conversation. Noun form: cotilla

Dar la lata -- To bug, annoy, bother. (literal translation: to give the can).

De cajón -- Evident, totally certain, obvious. (Ex: Es de cajón que Diana recibirá una "A" en su examen: estudia cada día.)

Echarme una siesta -- Be careful not to use "tomar" una siesta as it is better to use the verb echar in its reflexive form, meaning to lie down.

Gazpacho (m) -- A mess, predicament or jam, (literal translation: a type of Spanish tomato soup).

Gente maja (f) -- When you want to say that someone is really pleasant, nice and/or generous, you can refer to them as gente maja. In other words, you are saying, "They are good people."

Hincha (m) -- Fan of a specific soccer team. Una hinchada is a group of soccer fans.

Mala pata (f) -- Bad luck. (Ex: Fue mala pata que perdiera 1.000 euros en la calle.)

La marcha (f) (mar-chuh) -- Nightlife. However, it also means so much more than this since it also refers to the energy that Spaniards have when night time rolls around. It refers to dancing, eating, drinking and socializing. Spanish cities come to life after dark and la marcha refers to the entire scene... people crowding streets at all hours, dance clubs with long lines to get in, corner bars where friends meet one another, eating churros con chocolate in the morning before crawling into bed, etc. Synonymous to movida. Salir de marcha = To go out, to go party.

Móvil (m) -- Cell phone. You will get strange looks if you call it "un celular" so be sure to use móvil. Practically everyone in Spain has one so make sure you know what it is called!

Ni fu ni fa -- An expression that communicates indifference. (Ex: ¿Qué te parece esta falda?----Ni fu ni fa.)

¡Ojo! -- Look out! Watch out! (Ex: ¡Ojo! Caminar sóla por la noche es peligroso.)

¡Olé! -- Yippee! Alright!

Pasta (f) -- Means money. (Ex: ¿Tienes pasta?)

Pijo (m/f) -- An insult given to yuppies from Spain with no fixed age implied. Most often a pijo or pija is within his or her late teens to early thirties. He or she has expensive and most often poor taste and "Daddy" pays for everything.

Tapa (f) -- Tapas are small rations of meat, potatoes, fish and vegetables that are eaten at bars typically while having a cocktail. Tapas are sometimes served free while others cost a small fee. Many Spaniards eat tapas in the evening rather than sitting down to eat a full dinner. As compared to the way we refer to appetizers in the US, tapas do not come before a meal, but either accompany the act of drinking or are often eaten instead of a meal.

Tapear, or ir de tapas -- To eat tapas; to go from bar to bar eating these small appetizers.

Tapeo (m) -- The noun form of this activity. Refers to the entire event of going to bars and eating tapas.

Tertulia (f) -- Occurs when people meet together to chit--chat about everyday happenings whether it be the weather, politics, trends or even what María Josefina did last night. The Spaniards love having tertulias especially at outdoor cafés.

Vale -- This is used in the same way as we use "OK" or any of its equivalents: sure, I understand, I agree, etc. (Ex: Denota que se está de acuerdo con que otro dice o hace). When the Spanish say it, it kind of sounds like "ballet."

¡Venga, hombre! -- It is usually said at the end of a sentence to mean the following: "Yeah right," "Really, I don't believe you at all," "You have to be kidding," or "Stop it." You can also use: ¡Qué va! ¡Qué bobada! ¡Qué disparate! or ¡Qué tontería!

Viejo verde (m) -- An older man who preys on young women. In English, we say "dirty old man."

Buenas = (buey-NAS) A greeting used at any time of the day. Similar to Hello / Hola, but more informal.

Cabezota = (ka-bay-though-ta) Stubborn, when used as an adjective, and a stubborn person, when used as a noun.

Chaval / chavala = (cha-ball / cha-ball-ah) Guy, boy, kid, lad / girl.

Chiringuito = (chi-riin-gEE-to) Beach bar or seaside restaurant.

Chorrada = (cho-rA-da) Nonsense. ¡Qué chorrada! = What a bit of nonsense!

Chulo = (chew-low) When used as an adjective, chulo can mean: 1) nice, cool, etc. 2) cute, good-looking, 3) arrogant, insolent, cocky. ¡Qué chulo! = How cute! How cool!

Cutre = (coo-tray) Cheap, seedy, shabby, tacky, kitschy, cheesy.

Enchufe = (en-choo-fay) A connection, a contact, someone who has some kind of power or influence and can help you. An enchufe could get you a job interview, for example. Enchufe literally means a plug or a socket though.

Estar como una cabra = (es-tar ko-mo Oon-a ka-bra) To be completely crazy, nuts, bonkers.

Finde = Weekend. Shortened version of fin de semana.

Friki = (free-key) Nerd, geek, freak. For example, a friki de ordenadores is a computer nerd and a friki de ciencia ficción is a sci-fi geek.

Guay = (gwhy) Cool. ¡Qué guay! = How cool! How neat! How cool is that!

Guiri = (gEE-ree) Foreigner in Spain, especially an Anglo-Saxon or northern European foreigner. This word can be as affectionate or as disparaging as the speaker intends to make it.

Hortera = (or-ter-ah) Tacky, in bad taste.

Ir a su bola = (ear ah sue bowl-a) To do one’s own thing. For example, “No asistí a la fiesta, fui a mi bola” means “I didn’t go to the party, I did my own thing.”

Locutorio = (low-coo-tore-e-yo) Internet café where you can also make telephone calls (especially long-distance ones) in private booths, top up your mobile phone credit, buy phone cards, send faxes, etc. Locutorios largely cater to the non-Spanish market and can be found anywhere there’s a significant immigrant population in Spain.

Mileurista = (mill-lure-ista) Someone who earns approximately 1,000 euros per month. This relatively recent social phenomenon is a person in Spain who is often imagined as a twentysomething or thirtysomething with a low-paying job, who may or may not live with their parents, may or may not have a university degree, but has low prospects for improving their economic outlook.

Mono = (mo-no) Cute, when used as an adjective. ¡Qué mono! = How cute! Used as a noun, mono means monkey.

Nene / nena = (nay-nay / nay-nah) Baby / baby, chick, as in, “Hey, baby!” (Hola, nene [for a male] or Hola, nena [for a female]) or “I like that chick!” / “A mí me gusta esa nena.”

Operación bikini = (oh-per-ah-the-own be-key-knee) The pre-summer custom many people have of exercising, going on a diet, joining a gym, and other activities associated with wanting to look good in a bikini or swimsuit.

Operación salida = (oh-per-ah-the-own sa-lee-dah) Mass exodus and the resulting traffic on Spanish roads and highways at the beginning and end of the summer holiday season and various long weekends and holidays throughout the year.

Pasar de = (pah-saar day) To care less (about someone or something).

Pijo/a = (pee-ho) Upper class conservative, when used as a noun, and yuppy, preppy, posh, stuck up, snooty, and snobbish, when used as an adjective.

Puente = (pwen-tay) Long weekend due to a bank holiday.

¡Qué fuerte! or ¡Qué pasada! = (kay f-where-tay / kay pah-saa-dah) Wow! In other words, these expressions indicate great surprise or amazement, which can have positive or negative connotations, depending on the context.

Ser la leche = (sayr la lay-chay) To be amazing (in a positive or negative sense).

Siniestro = (see-knee-yestro) Goth, gothic.

Tener buen rollo / tener mal rollo = (ten-air bwen Roy-yo / ten-air mAll Roy-yo) To have good vibes, to have good chemistry. / To have bad vibes, to have bad chemistry. For example, “Mis compañeros de piso y yo tenemos buen rollo” means “My roommates and I get on very well.”

Terraza = (teR-a-zah) Sidewalk café, bar, restaurant, or seating area. Many cafes and restaurants in Spain expand their seating area by setting up tables and chairs outdoors – most often during the summertime, but some terrazas are year-round.

Tío / tía = (tea-yo / tea-ya) Guy or girl. This word is used in Spain more often than its English definition reveals, however, and is frequently heard in informal speech and/or among friends. For example, “Tía, ¿qué haces?” / “What are you doing?” (said to a woman friend).

Tío bueno / tía buena = (tea-yo bwen-oh / tea-ya bwen-ah) A hot guy / hot girl. Or a hunk / hottie.

Tipo = (tea-poh) Guy, especially a stranger. For example, “Did you see that guy?” / “¿Has visto a ese tipo?”

Topmanta = (topp-mahn-tah) Illegal street vendor who displays his wares (often pirated or counterfeited goods) on a small square of cloth – a manta / blanket, if you will – that is handily bundled up at a moment’s notice by the vendor, who often flees when the police appear.

Fliparse- to be crazy, mad, wild about, to be enthusiastic about someone or something.

La senorita Schleicher se flipa por Harry Potter. Miss Schleicher goes crazy for H.P.

Tirar los tejos -This expression is used to try to conquer or to make a girl or a boy fall in love. It means to make love proposals, to say comments with the purpose of getting the affection of a person. ¿Sabes que el otro día estabas muy guapa en la fiesta? Lo siento, no puedo evitar tirarte los tejos, pero es que me gustas mucho. –Do you know how pretty you looked at the party the other day? I’m sorry, I can’t avoid hitting on you, but I like you a lot.

Salir por un ojo de la cara (literally: Cost an eye) This is used to say that something is very expensive. Saying “the car cost me an eye” is like saying that to buy the car I had to sell an eye. In English there’s the very anatomically similar expression of “to cost an arm and a leg.”

A todo cerdo le llega su San Martín (literally: Every pig gets its San Martin’s Day): This mysterious proverb is used to express the inevitability of fate. The expression alludes to the natural expiration all things, and, more specifically, the inevitable end of those who do evil. It turns out that, in Spain, the traditional day for the slaughter of pigs (of which, between hams, bacon and sausages, nothing goes to waste) is on November 11, and in Spain this date corresponds to St. Martin of Tours. So, when hearing on the news that a politician is convicted on corruption charges, many will say, with satisfaction: “See? Eventually, every pig gets its San Martin’s Day.” A possible equivalent saying in English might be “What goes around, comes around” or “you reap what you sow.”


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