Programa de lectura de verano






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Part I

Literary Devices
As you read The Count of Monte Cristo, identify examples of the following literary terms and explain their connection/significance to the plot, setting, or characters.
**All entries must be typed in the boxes provided below using 12 pt. or smaller type, Times New Roman, and single-spaced. Failure to follow formatting instructions will result in point deductions.


Literary Terms

Example (quote and page #)

Connection/significance to the plot, setting, and characters

Example

Symbol: is an object that represents, stands for, or suggests an idea, belief, action

The Sea

“…there was a tremendous splash and he plunged like an arrow into the icy sea…the water closed over his head.” Pgs. 79-80

The sea is a symbol of Edmond’s “baptism” into a new life of revenge. When he escapes from prison, he leaves his old life behind and emerges from the water as a new man dedicated to taking revenge on the men who ruined his life.

Allusion: a figure of speech that makes a reference to, or a representation of, people, places, events, literary work, myths, or works of art, either directly or by implication

_____________________




Allusion: a figure of speech that makes a reference to, or a representation of, people, places, events, literary work, myths, or works of art, either directly or by implication


_____________________




Symbol: is an object that represents, stands for, or suggests an idea, belief, action

_____________________






Symbol: is an object that represents, stands for, or suggests an idea, belief, action



_____________________




Foreshadowing: a literary device in which an author hints certain plot developments that perhaps will come to be later in the story

_____________________




Foreshadowing: a literary device in which an author hints certain plot developments that perhaps will come to be later in the story

_____________________




Imagery: Vivid descriptive language that appeals to one or more of the senses (sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste)

_____________________




Imagery: Vivid descriptive language that appeals to one or more of the senses (sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste)

_____________________




Simile: a comparison of two unlike things using like or as

_____________________




Simile: a comparison of two unlike things using like or as


_____________________




Metaphor: A comparison made by referring to one thing as another (Ex. Life is a beach.)



_____________________




Metaphor: A comparison made by referring to one thing as another (Ex. Life is a beach.)



_____________________




Personification: giving human traits (qualities, feelings, actions, or characteristics) to non-living objects (things, colors, qualities, or ideas)


_____________________




Personification: giving human traits (qualities, feelings, action, or characteristics) to non-living objects (things, colors, qualities, or ideas)


_____________________





Part II

Character Dialectical Journal
As you read The Count of Monte Cristo, keep track of the development of Edmond as a character by completing the dialectical journal below. You must include three entries per section, each complete with an adjective/character trait, a supporting quote and page number, commentary, and the context. You will have a total of 15 entries documenting Edmond’s development throughout the course of the novel. The sections are as follows:

  • Beginning of the novel before Edmond is arrested (3 entries)

  • Edmond in prison and in ignorance (3 entries)

  • Edmond in prison after he meets Abbé and gains knowledge of what happened to him (3 entries)

  • Edmond when he escapes and becomes the Count (3 entries)

  • Edmond after the death of Madame Villefort and her son (3 entries)


**All entries must be typed in the boxes provided below using 12 pt. font, Times New Roman, and single spacing. Failure to follow formatting instructions will result in point deductions.

Example: Section 3

Character Train (describes Edmond)

Quote/pg #

Vengeful



“I almost regret having helped you in your researches and having told you what I did,” he said.

“Why?”

“Because I have instilled into your heart a feeling that previously held no place there---

vengeance.” Pg. 100

Commentary (your analysis)

Context (What is going on/who said this)

This is the point in the novel where Edmond finally realizes all of the evil that has been done to him. His loss of faith in humanity is also representative of his personal loss of innocence. We no longer read about a young, loving sailor. Instead, we find someone who has been replaced with a hateful being who has a wild thirst for revenge in his heart. Abbé here admits his regret in having a role in this loss of innocence, knowing that Edmond will never be the same now that he knows the truth about his imprisonment, the evil tendencies of humanity, and the alluring and unquenchable taste of vengeance.

In Chapter 13, this conversation occurs between Edmond and Abbé immediately following Edmond’s realization that his imprisonment came to be because of a betrayal. Abbé helps Edmond to realize the truth about his imprisonment, causing Edmond to become vengeful.



Beginning of the novel before Edmond is arrested


Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context







Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context








Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context








Edmond in prison and in ignorance


Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context









Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context









Character Trait

Quote/pg#







Commentary

Context






Edmond in prison after he meets Abbé and gains knowledge of what happened to him



Character Trait

Quote/pg#







Commentary

Context








Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context








Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context







Edmond when he escapes and becomes the Count


Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context








Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context








Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context





Edmond after the death of Madame Villefort and her son


Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context







Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context







Character Trait

Quote/pg#






Commentary

Context








Name:_________________________ Date:_________________________
English II Pre-AP Summer Reading Assignment

Grading Rubric

The Count of Monte Cristo
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

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