Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas






descargar 55.61 Kb.
títuloBallester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas
fecha de publicación25.06.2015
tamaño55.61 Kb.
tipoDocumentos
l.exam-10.com > Documentos > Documentos
References

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991).La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas.

Retrieved from: http://cvc.cervantes.es/ensenanza/biblioteca_ele/asele/pdf/03/03_0391.pdf

Baker, M., (Ed.). (1998). Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies. Adaptation. London, UK: Routledge.

Bouvet de Ranchero Hayde y Feldman Jacobo. (2001). El lenguaje lectoescrito y sus problemas c. Editorial Medica panamericana. Evaluación de la percepción visual en función de la lectura.

C. Martínez Patricia,(1997). La traducción en el aula de ingles, una actividad necesaria, natural y económica 155-161[Versión electrónica].

Retrieved from: http://www.mogap.net/pmt/AnaLauraEscobar.pdf

De Bako Mona. (2000). The translation studies reader. Edited by Lawrence venuti advisory. First pubished 2000 in the usa and Canada.

D. Pratt Daniel. (1998). Five perspectives on teaching in adult and higher education foreword by Stephen brookitield. alternative frames of understanding.

García Medall Joaquín. (2001) La traducción en la enseñanza de lenguas.

Retrieved from: http://www.ub.edu/filhis/culturele/garcia_medall.html

García de Arriba Clara,(1996).Introducción a la Traducción Pedagógica. 269-283[Versión electrónica].

Retrieved from: http://ruc.udc.es/dspace/bitstream/2183/7979/1/LYT_8_1996_art_17.pdf

García Medall Joaquín. (2001) La traducción en la enseñanza de lenguas.

Retrieved from: http://www.ub.edu/filhis/culturele/garcia_medall.html

Gierden Vega Carmen, (2002-2003).La traducción pedagógica como ejercicio integrativo en la didáctica del alemán como LE 90-100[Versión electrónica].

Hernandez Rosario M (1996).La traduccion pedagógica en la clase E/LE. 249-255 [Versión electrónica]University College Dublin, S, Madrid, Empeño 14. Retrieved from http://cvc.cervantes.es/ensenanza/biblioteca_ele/asele/pdf/07/07_0247.pdf

López González Alberto,(2003). La enseñanza de la traducción en estudiantes de ELE: El uso de la prensa como caso práctico. 708-714[Versión electrónica].

Retrieved from: http://cvc.cervantes.es/ensenanza/biblioteca_ele/asele/pdf/14/14_0709.pdf

R. Rickford Jonh. (1999). Socio linguistics and language teaching. Edited by lee mckay .cambridge applied linguistics. Series editors. Long Michael and C. Richards.

Rodríguez Rochette Virginia, (2005)¿Traducción pedagógica o pedagogía de la traducción?: Cuestión de Escopo. 393-399[Versión electrónica].

Retrieved from: http://acceda.ulpgc.es/bitstream/10553/5097/1/0235347_01992_0045.pdf

Poplack Shana (1999).the bilingualism Reader.sometimes i’ll start a sentence in spanish y termino en español: toward a typology of code switohing Edited by li wei. First Published in the usa and Canada.

Retrieved from: http://www.encuentrojournal.org/textos/13.9.pdf

Reyes, A. (1984). Método Inductivo. In Enciclopedia Ilustrada Cumbre (Vol.9, pp. 222). México: Cumbre.

Reyes, F. (2006) Interferencia léxica y sintáctica de la segunda lengua en la lengua materna en un seminario de iniciación a la traducción.

Retrieved from: www.saber.ula.ve/bitstream/123456789/17261/2/articulo4.pdf

Newmark, P. (1988). A textbook of Translation. New York and London: Prentice Hall.

Nida, E. (1984). On Translation. Beijing: Translation Publishing Corp.

Munday, J.(2001). Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and applications. (2ND. Ed.). London and New York: Routledge.

Vazques, G. (1977), Introducción a la Traductología.- curso básico de traducción, Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.

Vinay, J.-P. and J. Darbelnet. (1958). A Methodology for Translation. In L. Venuti, (ed.) The Translation Studies Reader (pp. 84-93). London and New York: Routledge.

Woodward (2009). Voz Pasiva.

Retrieved from: http://www.spanish.cl/Grammar/Notes/Voz_Pasiva.htm

Yates, J. (2006). Master the Basic English. (2nd.ed). New York: Barron´s Educational Series.

Yongfang, H. (2000). The Sociosemiotic Approach and Translation of Fiction. Retrieved from: http://accurapid.com/journal/14fiction.htm

Zabalbeascoa Terrán Patrick, (1990).Aplicaciones de la traducción a la enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras. 75-86 [Versión electrónica].

Retrieved from: http://www.raco.cat/index.php/Sintagma/article/viewFile/60403/85516

APENDIXES

APENDIX A

Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación y Humanidades.

Translation
Group: Date:

Instruction: with the help of a dictionary, please, read the following text.

Yo Soy 132 (English: I Am 132) is an ongoing Mexican protest movement centered around the democratization of the country and its media. It began as a protest led by college students against the former long-time ruling party Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), their presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto, and the Mexican media's allegedly biased coverage of the 2012 Mexican general election, where Peña Nieto is a favorite to become the new president.[1] The protest movement uses the slogan "YoSoy132", originating in an expression of solidarity with the protest's initiators.

During Peña Nieto's visit to the private Mexican university Iberoamericana, many of the attendees questioned and strongly showed their dissatisfaction with Peña Nieto. Some prominent media outlets and PRI politicians dismissed the attendees' reaction, saying that they had been smuggled by the other contending parties and were not really students. In response, 131 students who apparently attended the event quickly organized and posted a video on Youtube showing their student IDs and expressing their discontent with the media handling of the event. When people began tweeting "I'm the 132nd student", the phrase "yo soy 132" was coined. The phrase draws inspiration from theoccupy movement and its slogan "We are the 99%". The protest movement has been described as the "Mexican spring" in local media.[2]

Former State of Mexico governor Enrique Peña Nieto is allegedly favored by Mexico's only two nationwide TV Networks, Televisa and TV Azteca, with extensive coverage during the year prior to the confirmation of his candidacy. It is also widely believed[by whom?][citation needed] that this coverage was paid for using funds of the State of Mexico district, of which he was then governor, and that the coverage had contributed to his leadership in the polls. This has been widely criticized by those who see the return of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI, for its acronym in Spanish) as an historical regression.

Until early May 2012, polls by these two TV networks showed Peña Nieto with up to a 40% lead on national polls. On May 11, Peña Nieto held a conference with students in Universidad Iberoamericana. He was questioned severely by students and as he was exiting the conference room, hundreds of students began yelling at him to leave. Some showed signs expressing complete rejection of his candidacy, and many wore masks of former president Carlos Salinas de Gortari. Peña Nieto had only met support and cheers from the meetings organized and controlled by the PRI party until then. Security personnel made the candidate hide in a restroom until a route to avoid the protesters could be determined. He finally exited the campus with hundreds of students booing him as he left.

The president of PRI and many of his campaign staffers said this incident was staged by the leftist party candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, and that the participants were not real students or that they had been paid (porros—as they are colloquially referred to.) This caused anger among many of the Ibero students, prompting 131 of those who participated in the protest to publish a video on YouTube in which they identify themselves using their University's ID card. [3] The video went viral, and protests spread across various campuses. People showed their support of the 131 students and what they stood for by stating, mainly on Twitter, that they were the 132nd student—"I am 132"—giving birth to the Yo Soy 132 movement.

On May 19, massive protests against Televisa and Peña Nieto were held in the country's major cities, led by students from many different colleges. A demonstration organized by college ITAM was held outside Televisa headquarters.[4] Another protest was organized against Televisa by students from many colleges, public and private, on May 23, 2012, forcing the network to give widespread coverage of protests and to announce that they would broadcast the next presidential debate on their main TV channel (Canal de las Estrellas) on a nationwide basis. Students gathered in the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico to discuss further steps. They agreed on the objective of taking the movement beyond July's general election to become a national force. Another country-wide protest against Peña Nieto was announced to take place on June 10, 2012.

On May 23, 2012, the movement released its manifest.[5] an excerpt from it states: First – we are a non-partisan movement of citizens. As such, we do not express support of any candidate or political party, but rather respect the plurality and diversity of this movement's participants. Our wishes and demands are centered on the defense of Mexicans' freedom of expression and their right for information, in that these two elements are essential to forming a conscious and participating citizenship. For the same reasons, we support informed and well-considered voting. We believe that under the present political circumstances, abstaining or making a null vote are ineffective in promoting the construction of our democracy. We are a movement committed to the country's democratization, and as such, we hold that one necessary condition for this goal is the democratization of the media. This commitment derives from the current state of the national press, and from the concentration of the media outlets in few hands.

Second—YoSoy132 is an inclusive movement which does not represent one single university. Its representation depends only on the persons who join this cause and form connections between the university committees. The movement aspires to go beyond the country's upcoming general election on July 1, 2012, in order to deliver profound transformation of the current political system. However, its future will be influenced by the results of the presidential election, and the possibility of attempts by Peña Nieto to suppress the movement should he become president.

Wikipedia (2012) Yo soy 132(I am 132).Retrieved May 26,2012, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yo_Soy_132

Thanks for your cooperation!

APPENDIX B

Checklist 1

Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación y Humanidades.
Key translation (Spanish)

Yo Soy 132 es un curso mexicana de protesta el movimiento en torno a la democratización del país y sus medios de comunicación . Se inició como oposición al Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) candidato Enrique Peña Nieto y el mexicano los medios de comunicación supuestamente sesgada cobertura de la 2012 las elecciones generales de México . [1] El nombre de Yo Soy 132, español para "I Am 132", se originó en una expresión de solidaridad con los iniciadores de la protesta.

El 11 de mayo de 2012, Peña Nieto celebró una conferencia en la Universidad Iberoamericana . Muchos de los asistentes cuestionaron fuertemente y mostró su descontento con el candidato. Importantes medios de comunicación y los políticos del PRI desestimó la reacción de los asistentes, diciendo que habían sido introducidos de contrabando por las partes contendientes y no eran realmente los estudiantes.

En respuesta, los 131 estudiantes que asistieron al evento publicado un video en Youtube que muestra sus documentos de identidad de los estudiantes y expresar el descontento con el manejo de los medios de comunicación del evento. Cuando la gente empezó a expresar la solidaridad con los estudiantes por Twitter "Soy estudiante de 132o", el nombre yo soy 132 fue acuñado. El hashtag # veces se incluye como Yosoy132 enfatiza la conexión del movimiento de Twitter , donde todo el mundo era un tema de tendencia por varios días. La frase se inspira en el movimiento ocupa y el movimiento 15-M . [2] [3] [4] El movimiento de protesta ha sido descrita como la primavera de México en los medios de comunicación locales [5] y como el mexicano ocupa el movimiento en la prensa internacional. [6]

El movimiento de éxito exigió que el segundo debate presidencial transmitido a nivel nacional y ha propuesto un tercer debate que abarca un ámbito más amplio de cuestiones. [7]

El ex Estado de México, el gobernador Enrique Peña Nieto, presuntamente se ha favorecido por sólo dos de México y cadenas de televisión a nivel nacional, Televisa y TV Azteca , con una amplia cobertura durante el año previo a la confirmación de su candidatura. Hasta principios de mayo de 2012, las encuestas de estas dos redes de televisión mostraron a Peña Nieto, con un máximo de una ventaja de 40% en las encuestas nacionales. Peña Nieto ha sido criticado por aquellos que ven el regreso del Partido Revolucionario Institucional como una regresión al pasado de México de la corrupción y el autoritarismo. [8] [9] El largo dominio del PRI se vio empañada por acusaciones de corrupción y represión, y los estudiantes rechazar que Peña Nieto representa una nueva cara para el PRI. [10]

La Jornada, periódico, Proceso, la revista, el periodista Jenaro Villamil [11] y otros han afirmado que cuando Peña Nieto se desempeñó como gobernador del Estado de México, del distrito, utilizó fondos públicos para aumentar su cobertura de la televisión. Hasta el 07 de junio 2012, cuando The Guardian publicó un artículo sobre esta afirmación, la información no tienen un gran impacto. [12] de Televisa, el PRI y Peña Nieto ha negado las acusaciones. [13] [14]

El 11 de mayo de 2012, Peña Nieto visitó la Universidad Iberoamericana de celebrar una conferencia con los estudiantes, donde fue severamente cuestionada. Mientras salía de la sala de conferencias, cientos de estudiantes comenzaron a gritarle a salir. Algunos mostraban signos que expresaban el rechazo total de su candidatura, y muchos llevaban máscaras del ex presidente Carlos Salinas de Gortari . Peña Nieto sólo se había reunido el apoyo y los aplausos de las reuniones organizadas por el PRI hasta entonces. El personal de seguridad hizo la piel candidatos en un baño hasta una ruta para evitar que los manifestantes se pudo determinar. Finalmente, abandonó la escuela con cientos de estudiantes a abuchearlo.

Peña Nieto y muchos de los empleados de su campaña dijo que este incidente fue organizado por el candidato del partido izquierdista Andrés Manuel López Obrador , y que los participantes no eran verdaderos estudiantes o que se hubieran pagado (porros, ya que se refieren coloquialmente). Esto enfureció a muchos de los estudiantes de la Universidad Iberoamericana y llevó a 131 de ellos para publicar un video en YouTube en el que se identifican con su tarjeta de identificación de la Universidad. [15] El video fue viral y protestas se extendieron a través de campus diferentes. La gente mostró su apoyo del mensaje de los 131 estudiantes al afirmar, sobre todo en Twitter, que eran el estudiante-132a: "Yo soy 132"-dando a luz al movimiento Yo Soy 132.

Las protestas se volvió principalmente contra el duopolio de Televisa y TV Azteca y los acusó de mala cobertura y parcial de las protestas. Mientras que muchas tiendas independientes, los medios de comunicación electrónicos cubrieron los acontecimientos, su público es relativamente pequeño, ya que sólo el 31% de los mexicanos tienen en el acceso a Internet en casa.

19 de mayo de 2012, protestas masivas en contra de Televisa y Peña Nieto se llevaron a cabo en las principales ciudades del país, dirigido por estudiantes de muchas universidades diferentes. Una manifestación masiva organizada por la universidad ITAM se llevó a cabo fuera de la sede de Televisa. [17] La protesta incluye una gran Mariachi grupo que llevó a cabo en Las Golondrinas - una canción mexicana usado históricamente para decir adiós. [18]

El 23 de mayo de 2012, otra protesta en contra de Televisa, fue organizado por estudiantes de universidades públicas y privadas. Esto llevó a la red para dar una amplia cobertura de las protestas y para anunciar que el segundo debate presidencial sería transmitido por los principales de Televisa canal de televisión nacional Canal de las Estrellas . TV Azteca también ha respondido con el anuncio de la intención de la red para transmitir el debate a nivel nacional. [7]

El 10 de junio de 2012, otra protesta en todo el país contra el Peña Nieto se llevó a cabo, en el mismo día de la emisión del segundo debate presidencial. [19] La fecha también se conmemora el 1971 masacre de Corpus Christi , cuando las protestas estudiantiles fueron violentamente oprimidos. [20] [21]

El éxito del movimiento en el que llevó a miles de estudiantes se reúnan ha hecho analistas se preguntan si el movimiento va a causar problemas al próximo gobierno. [22] Sin embargo, los líderes del movimiento estudiantil, dijo que si Peña Nieto gana las elecciones del 1 de julio de bastante , no van a organizar más protestas. [22] El dirigente dijo que van a "respetar [de México] la democracia y sus instituciones", pero si hay evidencia de fraude , las protestas continuarán. [22]

El 5 de junio de 2012, los estudiantes se reunieron en la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), el país más grande universidad pública, para discutir los objetivos comunes. Estuvieron de acuerdo en que el movimiento debe aspirar a ir más allá de las elecciones generales y convertirse en una fuerza nacional.

APPENDIX C

FACULTAD DECIENCIAS DE LA EDUCACIÓN Y HUMANIDADES: DES-DAEH

QUESTIONNAIRE

Universidad Autónoma del Carmen

Des-DAEH
Questionnaire about Translation exercises.

Aim: This research instrument is approached to fists grade of Junior High students in order to measure the comprehension of data from informative texts.

Research project: Pedagogy Translation through the borrowing, Calque and Literal translation procedures enhances the Spanish language speakers understanding of (L1) students of Junior High in the reading English Language of Informative articles (L2).

Instruction: Underline the best option you consider in the following items.

Name:

  1. What is “El movimiento Yo soy #132”?



  1. A party done by students b) A protest against Iusacell c) A protest done by “PRI” d) A protest against Televisa and “PRI” Presidential Candidate



  1. Of what is the movement form?



  1. College students b) Politicians c) Reporters d) Actors



  1. In which city was this movement created?



  1. USA b) Mexico c) Guatemala d) Brazil



  1. In what place was this movement created?



  1. UNACAR b) UNAM c) Universidad Iberoamerica d) Tecnológico de Monterrey



  1. What are they looking for with the movement?



  1. A wide open information from national TV stations b) Money c) A politic charge d) A war between TV national stations and Mexican people



  1. What type of movement is this?

a) Professors-Students-Information b) Movies-Actors c) Information-Reporters d) Politics-Information-Students

  1. Which candidate are they against?

a) Enrique Peña Nieto b) Andrés Manuel López Obrador c) Pedro Joaquín Coldwell d) Carlos Salinas de Gortari

  1. Which are the two TV stations they claim that are supporting an electorate campaign?

a) UNAM-IPN b) 11-AMERICAN NETWORK c) Cadena Tres-Al Jazeera d) Televisa-TV-Azteca

Thanks for your cooperation!

APPENDIX D
Checklist 2

FACULTAD DECIENCIAS DE LA EDUCACIÓN Y HUMANIDADES: DES-DAEH CHECKLIST OF QUESTIONNAIRE


  1. What is “El movimiento Yo soy #132”?

a) A party done by students b) A protest against Iusacell c) A protest done by “PRI” d) A protest against Televisa and “PRI” Presidential Candidate

  1. Of what is the movement form?



  1. College students b) Politicians c) Reporters d) Actors



  1. In which city was this movement created?



  1. USA b) Mexico c) Guatemala d) Brazil



  1. In what place was this movement created?



  1. UNACAR b) UNAM c) Universidad Iberoamerica d) Tecnológico de Monterrey



  1. What are they looking for with the movement?



  1. A wide open information from national TV stations b) Money c) A politic charge d) A war between TV national stations and Mexican people



  1. What type of movement is this?

a) Professors-Students-Information b) Movies-Actors c) Information-Reporters d) Politics-Information-Students

  1. Which candidate are they against?

a) Enrique Peña Nieto b) Andrés Manuel López Obrador c) Pedro Joaquín Coldwell d) Carlos Salinas de Gortari

  1. Which are the two TV stations they claim that are supporting an electorate campaign?

a) UNAM-IPN b) 11-AMERICAN NETWORK c) Cadena Tres-Al Jazeera d) Televisa-TV-Azteca

Añadir el documento a tu blog o sitio web

similar:

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconSegundas Lenguas y Lenguas Extranjeras

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconTraducción de Javier Guerrero

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconGuillorme, Belsué Katrina; gallego, Patricia; Del Rosario, Constanza;...

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconSegún el Real Decreto 1420/1991, que establece el título universitario...

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconTraducción de Ana Belén Costas

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconTraducción de Ana Belén Costas

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconTraducción de Ana Belén Costas

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconTraducción de Ana Belén Costas

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconAsí como las diferentes teorías psicolingüísticas han dado lugar...

Ballester Casado Ana, Chamorro Guerrero Dolores, (1991). La Traducción como estrategia cognitiva en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas iconComo siempre, el gran Sabina y sus recitales. Todo un lujo para los...






© 2015
contactos
l.exam-10.com